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PRINCE2 2017 - Full one hour overview of PRINCE2 from Mandate to Closure

One of the best overviews of how PRINCE2 works by Antony della Porta of  The Sustainable PM



[embed]https://youtu.be/lMs8_aWYc5o[/embed]

This video looks at getting the project started with the activities, and any documents recommended and take you up to a point at the end of Initiating a Project and being ready (hopefully) to kick the delivery part of the project off in earnest. Run the plan!

The message is that we need to start with a broad yet formal understanding of the "Why What and How" of the project in "Starting Up a Project" and build on the that with more detail through "Initiating a Project." At the end of "Starting Up a Project," the next step is to go to "Directing a Project" (which is where the Project Board function for direction and decision) to "Request Initiate a Project" and kicks off this Process. Note that even though the Project Executive is on board from Starting Up a Project, it is only when "Starting Up a Project" is complete, and the Project Brief is ready along with the Initiating Stage Plan, does "Directing a Project" start.

"Step at a time" - "Detail builds with each step" so we can keep in control and by that I mean from a "Governance" perspective, so we do NOT have a "runaway train." In "Initiating a Project" we look at Planning as this is the key activity here. We need to understand the products (product breakdown), so then we can prioritize, estimate and then Plan. This helps us update all the project documents we started in "Starting Up a Project" to provide the business with the best information they need to make an "informed decision" as to whether the project is worth the investment or not. The underlying point here is to understand and agree on the project "Scope"!

Should we get the "Green Light" at the end of "Initiating a Project" we then move into the "Delivery" part, "Controlling a Stage" and "Managing Product Delivery".

Now for the product build part, there are some separate videos that you through "Scrum" and how the core of the "Product Deliver" approach, Iterative Development, and using "Timeboxes" (Sprints in Scrum) are used to control ID. The session also explains how to use this approach in a project as there need to be some changes! We also look at handling Risk and Issues, with escalation and the "Exception" route.

Finally, the video takes you through a recap of the previous videos and then leads into "Closing a Project," with a look both aspect, normal and premature closure.

Please note: this is not a course in itself, its a "walkthrough" to provide you with a good and reasonably detailed understanding of the approach.

PRINCE2 is a guidance and a framework to guide you through the project.

The full accredited course can be found on http://www.d-p-c.net/courses.html

You will see the course card on the Landing Page.

All the courses are run as a "Classroom" with the details drawn on a whiteboard throughout the explanation

For a full image of the new life cycle follow this link: http://bit.ly/P2-2017ProcessMap

PRINCE2®, MSP®, M_o_R® and MoP® are registered trademarks of AXELOS Limited.

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