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RAD with Symfony

I have always been jealous of RoR but I did not to switch and kill my passion to PHP at the same time there was no PHP framework that satisfy my needs to RAD so I stopped looking until recently I was introduce to Symfony Framework but didn't had the time to dig much into it as I'm not full time programmer anymore but I kept an eye on it and kept digging it as a Todo.
Couple of days ago I got The Definitive Guide to Symfony and unlike many other technical books it's authored by the author of the framework and the framework documenter which is a great plus when buying a technical book.
If you are not used to MVC frameworks then you should understand that learning curve in Symfony is a pain that worth going through and it will heal any pain you used to get when developing without a framework, nevertheless the guide book makes it way easier, the book is well written in an easy language
I will keep you update as I'm reading the book.
[tags] time programmer,learning curve,easy language,ror,definitive guide,technical books,couple of days,full time,passion,symfony[/tags]

Comments

  1. Feel free to join us on #symfony (irc.freenode.org)!
    Welcome to the wonderful world of symfony!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Don't want to start any flame wars here, symfony is without a doubt a great piece of software, but if you are a MVC beginner and want to avoid a steep learning curve ZendFramework is probably a better option, if only for the reason it is not yet as packed with the features as symfony is. But when you learn to use ZF (which is not that easy-peasy too) then it would be much easier to utilise any other MVC framework, symfony included.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Welcome to the beautiful world of symfony! :)
    It rules bigtime

    ReplyDelete
  4. Welcome on board, I hope you'll appreciate your flight ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  5. @Tomek - I think you'll find most people will put ZF and symfony both in the "steep learning curve" category. Symfony because it has a lot of features, and ZF because it is a loosely-coupled framework that requires a bit of design to "put together".
    Anyone looking for a PHP framework that goes easy on beginners might be best looking at Cake or CodeIgniter (full disclosure: I am firmly a symfony fan and don't know any other frameworks thoroughly).

    ReplyDelete

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