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huh? just to finger the Government?

Would you abide by speed limit to save your life and others lives; to participate in making our streets safer for the sake of being a good citizen or would you be like Khalaf and do it just to avoid speeding ticket and then to finger the government ?

Khalaf -
I mean it. Today I went to Irbid, and on the way about 8 patrols were stopping cars. As for me, I used my cruise control to adjust my speed every few minutes (whenever the speed limit changes). It took me a few minutes longer, but I managed to avoid being stopped. I have vowed that they will not take another dinar from me for any traffic violations.

Imagine if we all decide to do this. Nobody will be fined, and the government will lose the investment that it made. What better way to lift our collective middle finger to our insatiably greedy government?



He's saying it as if the government and police patrols are aliens (too much star wars?) aren't they our families, relatives and friends? Why do we look at them as strangers? and in many cases as enemy?


There is no rounds when dealing with a patrol or a government personnel; it's all about forcing the law, we are not fighting with them and they are not fighting with us; we are one big family called Jordan, they have to be good patrols and we have to be good citizens and no fingers in between.



[tags] being a good citizen, finger speed, limit changes, good citizens, khalaf, control traffic, cruise control, government personnel, police patrols, traffic violations, speeding ticket, middle finger, speed limit, aliens, few minutes, sake, relatives, fingers, star wars, jordan[/tags]

Comments

  1. Too much of an us and them atitude.

    mkilany was writing about the same subject.

    When I see how we drive and how some won't even stop at a red light (the most serious infraction in the traffic law) unless there is a camera there, I'm glad they raised the fines so much.

    Try waiting for cars to let you cross on a pedestrian crossing, you're in for a long wait. Even then only pedestrian bridges work because they don't depend on the courtesy of the drivers.

    For me, the only problem with the law is when they automaticaly put the driver in jail if they hit a pedestrian even if the pedestrian s at fault. For example a pedestrian crossing the freeway. Even the pedestrians don't stick to their designated areas unless a big fence is placed in the middle. Some will even climb the fence instead!

    The other case is that if you give someone a lift in your car, and then have an accident, even if the accident was ruled as the other driver's fault, you will be responsible for any dammages inccured by your passenger and not the driver responsible for the accident.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes Jad. It is all about enforcing the law. It is not about collecting money. Not at all. I mean, if it were simply about collecting money, then they would change speed limits erratically and suddenly all along the road. They would set the limits at least 20km per kour lower than the logical road conditions would require. Of course. It is about enforcing the LAW! But wasn't the law enforcable before they raised the fines? What prevented them from doing it this way then? Too little reward?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Khalaf El mutakhalifFebruary 29, 2008 at 7:02 PM

    With a name like KHALAF, what did you expect ??

    ReplyDelete
  4. So from your post I guess you are happy with the government?The logic of allahom nafsi should stop. You should look at what is happeninig to the people around you!

    The soloution is not higher fines, people can't even afford a gas cylinder and now you want them to pay 250 JDs for a ticket? You want to give more power to the police? Don't you know that more power means more corruption? Well what about the policeman whose paycheck is less than the fine?

    Short sightedness is not the best way to solve problems..Oh, I forgot it is jordan!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hani Obaid
    I agree with you, legislations aren't fair when it comes to the driver in cases like hitting someone even if it wasn't his mistake; they should revisit that part of the law because it it's meaningless.


    Khalaf
    The law was enforced before but people are ok with paying the little old fines; who would care about 50 JOD for crossing the traffic lights? I wouldn't care; but now it's 250 to 500 plus jail now this make a difference, yes such number accompanied with possibility of jail scares me.

    So my choices are either to be a good citizen or fear the expensive fines and both will make our roads safer.



    Khalaf El Mutakhalif
    With the name khalaf I expect a Jordanian and reading his blog would tell that he's well educated person; not sure if you ever heard about Ethics of disagreement if not then it's the time to google it.

    Mohanned
    It's not about being happy with the government or being against it; it's about my safety, your safety, dude, I did many crazy things in my life and believe me bungee jump seems way safer than crossing many of Ammanie roads even on pedestrian crossing.

    I'm not Allahoma Nafsi, I'm talking about reasoning your really good initiative, Khalaf called for something really good but the reason was really unexpected from him; so basically I agree with him but not with his reason.


    On the other side; if you cannot afford 250 JDs tickets just don't commit them and btw slower driving saves gasoline so if you care about money don't get in a speed test.

    Talking about power and corruption could be right but then would you propose a better solution?

    ReplyDelete
  6. First, first and foremost it is the govenrment mistake, so it is not right or just to throw all the blame on drivers.
    Second, Education, education, educatio.
    Third, tougher rules when applying for a driving license.
    fourth, Gradual fines and punishment. Eg:First ticket 50 jds, second ticket 150 Jds, third violation 250 JDs plus revoking the ticket, etc...
    As for corruption and power, this is beyond what me and you can suggest.

    If what keeps people from commiting violations is just the fear of paying money, then I don't know what to say except: Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I once had to pay a 40 JD fine on the desert HIGHWAY because at some point the speed limit became 60 km/h!!! Why? because apparently there is a town (it was basically 4 buildings attached to the road)!!! I wonder if this happened now how much I would have to pay.
    Sorry Jad but in this case it is simply about collecting money and not enforcing the law, if they did want to enforce the law then they wouldn't allow these buildings to be put right on a national highway (usually it is not allowed to build within 50 meters of a highway). Some of these fines are simply ridiculous, the problem is mainly with the enforcement and infrastructure and not with the level of fines.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Mohanned
    I totally agree with you and I wish we have someone with such thoughts at Central Traffic Directorate or parliament, I really wish.

    Onzlo
    Who said I'm Ok with highway speed limit or crossing villages in highway? I'm totally against that.

    Come on guys, changes takes time; you cannot ask for extreme changes in a small country like Jordan after seeing what others have; changes takes time and adapting it takes even more time in many classes.

    ReplyDelete

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