Skip to main content

Write Portable Code

How many times do programmers have to port software written to run on one particular architecture into another (or more than one) architecture? Does it always go smoothly? If you answered ?yes?, you might not need this book. But if your answer was ?no?, then this book is for you.

Brian Hook is a professional software developer, and has worked primarily in the gaming and entertainment industry. He collected his experiences in this book in order to advise us on how to write portable software.

Despite its physical dimensions (due to the use of recycled paper), ?Write Portable Code? is a concise book: it?s only 250 pages, but it?s crammed with examples. This might sound like an exaggeration, but I think of it as a sort of new Kernighan and Ritchie: Hook was clever enough and so well focused, that he wrote precisely the right amount to cover everything he needed to, without rambling.

Hook takes into account all of the aspects of writing portable code that a programmer might face: editing, porting, scalability, internationalization, processors and networking. And he doesn?t forget to explain how portability can be affected by operating systems, floating point management, filesystems, data formats and dynamic libraries. Since he?s chosen C/C++ as the reference programming languages, Hook has devoted some chapters to the compilers and the preprocessor.

Even though Hook has chosen the C/C++ languages, he still advises using other, higher level (scripting) languages, to improve portability. One chapter summarizes some of them.


via FreeSoftwareMagazine
[tags] freesoftware, magazine, book, review [/tags]

Comments

  1. Well,
    In my opinion it is better to use managed code framework like Java or .NET for your portable applications (for business development). It is faster in development since you don't get stuck wth memory allocation #558400 in your project.

    However I am still interested in low level languages since they bring great knowledge of the systems you are using and how actually the managed code frameworks work.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

اهم التطورات العلمية في العام ٢٠١٩

Dear Microsoft : It's over. Our relationship just hasn't been working for a while, and now, this is it. I'm leaving you for another Operating system. I know this isn't a good time--you're down with yet another virus. I do hope you feel better soon--really, I do--but I, too, have to move on with my life. Fact is, in the entire time I've known you, you seem to always have a virus or an occasional worm. You should really see a doctor. That said, I just can't continue with this relationship any longer. I know you say you'll fix things, that next time it'll go better--but that's what you said the last time--and the time before that. Each time I believed you. Well, not any longer. You cheater! The truth is there's nothing more you can say to make things better. I know about your secret marriage to patent. You say you two are not seeing each other anymore, but I just don't believe it. You say you can live without patent, and I've heard that

Saddam's novel to be published next week

AMMAN, Jordan: Saddam Hussein's family will publish next week a novel written by the ousted Iraqi leader before the US-led war on Iraq, his daughter said on Friday. "Ekhroj minha ya mal'un" whose title could be translated into "Get out, damned one" tells the story of a man called Ezekiel who plots to overthrow a town's sheik, but is defeated in his quest by the sheik's daughter and an Arab warrior. The story is apparently a metaphor for a Zionist-Christian plot against Arabs and Muslims. Ezekiel is meant to symbolize the Jews. Raghad Saddam Hussein said her father finished the novel on March 18, 2003 -- a day before the US-led war on Iraq began -- and had expressed a wish to publish the book under his name. The three other novels he wrote were simply signed "Its author." "It was my father's will to publish this book," Raghad said in a telephone interview. Read more An Iraqi artist designed the book's cover, she said, and a